Elizabeth, was selected as a Queens Young Leader and member of the Associate Fellow Network in recognition of the work she is doing to use technology to transform the lives of people living with mental health issues in Uganda.

To tackle issues
around mental health, Elizabeth co-founded Clear Yo Mind, which has created a secure and safe space online for people to express their feelings, access free help from mental health professionals. Now more than ever technology is playing a role all around the Commonwealth in the most unsuspected way.


Elizabeth demonstrates how being one of the 60% of the Commonwealth under 30, is in no way a barrier to leading and creating change.


We at the Royal Commonwealth Society asked Elizabeth her thoughts on her work with Clear Yo Mind and the future of youth leadership in the Commonwealth.

What was your inspiration? 

"In 2016, life backed me into a corner with stress, anxiety and depression. I couldn’t speak up for fear of stigma, and didn’t know where to find help. 

I was determined to give mental health a human voice to eradicate stigma, and connect people with mental health issues to professional help.

I’m passionate about mental health because I believe good health makes everything else relevant, so I make a big difference where it matters most. I really care about the positive and sustainable development of my community, my country and our world, and are aware that mentally healthy people are better able to contribute to the development of society. My work at Clear Yo Mind, which is directly under SGD 3, leaves me fulfilled knowing that the work we do today will have a positive ripple effect for generations to come."

My dream is that before the end of next year, Clear Yo Mind will be setting up the first mental health hotline in Uganda

Did you face any challenges?

"Yes, I did, and I still do. I think I greatly underestimated how hard it can be trying to make a reasonable impact in the mental health sector when you deal with a mental health issue yourself. There are days when I burn out so completely and I get intense migraines and I can’t hear myself think. Then there are other days when everything is great, and I get a lot done and I feel that I am making a real difference in people’s lives. Sometimes, reread all the positive messages we receive from people we have helped and those come in really handy on those rainy days.

I have also learned that there is a lot of power in positive self-talk. On days when it is really hard, I remind myself that I am still doing my best and that I should appreciate the progress we are making at Clear Yo Mind. People are more comfortable speaking out about their mental health, and the number of people contacting us for professional mental health care via our social media has greatly increased.

I do not want to mention the obvious financial constraints but I have had to hold down four steady consultancies to ensure that I made enough money to survive and to support the dream that is CYM. I am thankful for the recent partnership with Comic Relief, where we were selected as one of the Queen’s Young Leaders Legacy Fund grantees. The grant will help us secure the key partnerships we need in order to be able to consolidate and scale our work."

What does it mean to you to be a Queen’s Young Leader?

"Being a Queen’s Young Leader is phenomenal and has given my work in Uganda’s mental health sector credibility, which has made other people in the sector want to work with Clear Yo Mind. Since I have funded the initiative since idea inception, partnerships are always more than welcome for how they help improve resource availability. I also have more confidence in myself, and in the ability of others around me, and that has improved working relations immensely.

Every time I second guess myself too much, or unintentionally tell my team I worry we are going to fail, I will remind myself of the words the Queen said to me, and that I have a family in the QYL network.

I believe that the Commonwealth is a valuable resource and platform because of the arising synergy and commitment to several values ensuring the welfare of all persons from diverse people all over the world.

Being a Queen’s Young Leader developed my thoughts about the Commonwealth and what the future of the Commonwealth might be. It helped me realise that we are the leaders we have been waiting for. Positive change in our world, and in the Commonwealth, starts with the young people today who are making incremental changes within their communities.

Why is it important for youth leadership in the Commonwealth?

"I believe that the Commonwealth is a valuable resource and platform because of the arising synergy and commitment to several values ensuring the welfare of all persons from diverse people all over the world.

Being a Queen’s Young Leader developed my thoughts about the Commonwealth and what the future of the Commonwealth might be. It helped me realise that we are the leaders we have been waiting for. Positive change in our world, and in the Commonwealth, starts with the young people today who are making incremental changes within their communities"

What is your message to other young leaders in the Commonwealth?

My message to other young leaders is ALWAYS endevor to be the best version of yourself.

Are you interested in the work of Elizabeth Kasujja and or the Queens Young Leaders. Find out more about the work of our Queens Young Leaders in out Associte ellow network today!

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